Integrating the Social Sciences and the Arts in Research Planning

“Tahoe’s educators are collaborating more than ever to get science-based information out to Tahoe’s stakeholders. The common goal is to help people to understand Tahoe’s environmental problems and what we can do about them, and to motivate them to become part of the solution. Since the Lake Tahoe Environmental Education Coalition (LTEEC) conducted its 2003 Delphi-technique survey to gather and prioritize needed educational messages and programs, several such programs are now underway.” — Lake Tahoe Environmental Education Coalition

Integrating Social Sciences and the Arts in Research Planning

  • Recreation
  • Transportation
  • Economics
  • Scenic Resources
  • Noise
  • Metathemes and Emerging Areas of Interest
  • Near-Term Social Science Research Priorities
  • Rephotography

Researcher Profiles-Environmental Economics and Policy Analysis

Researcher Profiles-Rephotography

Related Publications

  • Goin, P. (2012). Lake Tahoe: A Maritime History. Arcadia Publishing (SC).
  • Goin, P. (2010). South Lake Tahoe. Arcadia Publishing.
  • Kobayashi, M., Zirogiannis, N., Rollins, K., & Evans, M. D. R. (2010). Estimating Private Incentives for Wildfire Risk Mitigation: Determinants of Demands for Different Fire-Safe Actions. Selected Paper prepared for presentation at the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association’s, 25-27.
  • Rollins, K. S., & Kobayashi, M. (2010). Embedding a Field Experiment in Contingent Valuation to Measure Context-Dependent Risk Preferences: An Application to Wildfire Risk. Selected Paper prepared for presentation at the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association’s, 25-27.
  • Rollins, K., & Kobayashi, M. (2010). UNR Joint Economics Working Paper Series.
  • Kauneckis, D., & Imperial, M. T. (2007). Collaborative watershed governance in Lake Tahoe: An institutional analysis. International Journal of Organization Theory and Behavior10(4), 503.
  • Goin, P. (2005). Lake Tahoe. Arcadia Publishing (SC).
  • Goin, P., & Starrs, P. F. (2005). Black Rock. University of Nevada Press.
  • Hagerty, D., K. Moeltner. (2005). Specification Of Driving Costs In Models Of Recreation Demand. Land Economics81(1):127-143. AbstractOnline Article (UNR Access Only)
  • Kauneckis, D., & Imperial, M. T. (2005). An Institutional Analysis of Collaborative Watershed Management: The Lake Tahoe Case.
  • Moeltner, K., J. S. Shonkwiler. (2005). Correcting For On-Site Sampling In Random Utility Models. American Journal of Agricultural Economics 87(2):327-339. AbstractOnline Article (UNR Access Only)
  • Moeltner, K., J. S. Shonkwiler. (2005). Correcting For On-Site Sampling In Random Utility Models. American Journal of Agricultural Economics 87(2):327-339. AbstractOnline Article (UNR Access Only)
  • Cobourn, J. (2004). LTEEC Performs Needs Assessment Survey To Aid Educational Planning. LTEEC Newsletter4(1):1-2.Goin, P., & Raymond, C. E. (2003). the evolving landscape of lake tahoe.Contexts2(1), 69-69.
  • Cobourn, J., H. Segale. (2004). Progress Report On Priority Environmental Education Projects. LTEEC NewsletterTahoe Summit Special Publication:1-3.
  • Beckmann, J. P. and J. Berger. (2003). Using Black Bears To Test Ideal-Free Distribution Models. Journal of Mammalogy 84(2):594-606. AbstractOnline Article (UNR access only)
  • Cobourn, J. (2003). Charles Goldman Awarded DRI’s 2003 Nevada Medal. LTEEC Newsletter 3(2):1,10.
  • Cobourn, J. (2003). Fourth Annual Meeting Of LTEEC To Feature Mini-Forum. LTEEC Newsletter 3(3):1,10.
  • Cobourn, J. (2003). LTEEC’s 4th Annual Meeting Draws 100 People, Grows Ideas. LTEEC Newsletter 3(4):1-2.
  • Cobourn, J. (2003). LTEEC Partners With KOLO-TV. LTEEC Newsletter 3(1):1,10.
  • Imperial, M. T., & Kauneckis, D. (2003). Moving from Conflict to Collaboration: Watershed Governance in Lake Tahoe. Nat. Resources J.43, 1009.
  • Smith, E., Skelly, J. (2003). Living With Fire In The Lake Tahoe Basin. Cooperative Extension Curriculum MaterialsCM-03-12. Online publication
  • Cobourn, J. (2002). LTEEC Annual Meeting. LTEEC Newsletter 2(3):1, 10.
  • Cobourn, J. (2002). LTEEC Readies For Spring And Summer Events. LTEEC Newsletter 1(4):1-2.
  • Cobourn, J. (2002). LTEEC Sets New Program Thrusts. LTEEC Newsletter 2(4):1,10.
  • Cobourn, J. (2002). LTEEC Steering Committee Charts Ambitious Course. LTEEC Newsletter 2(1):1-2.
  • Cobourn, J., B. Carlos, J. Christopherson, W. Johnson, R. Post, J. Skelly, and E. Smith. (2002). Home Landscaping Guide For Lake Tahoe And Vicinity. Cooperative Extension Education Bulletin EB0201. Online publication
  • LTEEC. (2001). Lake Tahoe Environmental Education Coalition (LTEEC) Reaches Out To The Public. LTEEC Newsletter 1(1):1,4.
  • Eiswerth, M. E., S. G. Donaldson, W. S. Johnson. (2000). Potential Environmental Impacts And Economic Damages Of Eurasian Watermilfoil (Myriophyllum Spicatum) In Western Nevada And Northeastern California. Weed Technology 14(3):511-518. AbstractOnline Article (UNR access only)
  • Ichinose, G. A., J. G. Anderson, K. Satake, R. A. Schweickert, M.L. Lahren. (2000). The Potential Hazard From Tsunami And Seiche Waves Generated By Large Earthquakes Within Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada.Geophysical Research Letters 27(8):1203-1206. Online Article
  • Miller, W. W.; D. W. Johnson. (2000). Lake Tahoe In The 21st Century; Where Have We Been? Where Are We Now? What Next? Abstracts with Programs – Geological Society of America 32(7):243.
  • Tingley, J.V., K.A. Pizarro. (2000). Traveling America’s Loneliest Road; A Geologic And Natural History Tour Through Nevada Along U.S. Highway 50. Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Special Publication 26; 136 pp.
  • Webb, M., Dawson, R. (2000) A Doubtful River. University of Nevada Press. Wilbur S. Shepperson Book Award, Nevada Humanities.
  • Butt, A. Z., K. Comanor, K. Krauter, D. S.Olsen, J. P. Potyondy. (1999). Impacts Of Land Use On Sediment Concentrations Of Selected Streams, Lake Tahoe Basin; Analysis Of GIS Data. American Water Resources Association Technical Publication Series TPS, vol.99-3. Bethesda, AWRA – American Water Resources Association:509-515.
  • Wells, S. G., J. S. Coleman, J. N. Crowley, K. W. Hunter. (1999). Cooperative Efforts Around Lake Tahoe. Nature402(6760):348. Online Article (UNR access only)
  • McConnell, L. L., J. S. LeNoir, S. Datta, J. N. Seiber. (1998). Wet Deposition Of Current-Use Pesticides In The Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, California, USA. Environmental Toxicology And Chemistry 17(10):1908-1916.
  • Huntsinger, L. (1997). Managing Nature: Stories Of Dynamic Equilibrium. Report — University of California Water Resources Center 92:3-8.
  • Christopherson, J., S. R. Lewis, and M. Havercamp. (1996). Lake Tahoe’s Forest Health Consensus Group. Journal Of Forestry 94(8):10-12.
  • Christopherson, J. and E. Smith. (1995). The Tahoe Landscape – A Bmp Education-Program. Journal Of Soil And Water Conservation 50(3):272-274.
  • Christopherson, J. and R. Post. (1994). Using Fertilizers Properly. Cooperative Extension Fact Sheet FS-94-1. Online publication
  • Goodrich, J. M., J. Berger. (1994). Winter Recreation And Hibernating Black Bears Ursus Americanus. Biological Conservation 67:105-110. Abstract
  • Post, R. and J. Christopherson. (1994). Turf Fertilization At Lake Tahoe. Cooperative Extension Fact Sheet FS-94-64. Online publication
  • Knapp, P. A., K. A. Bishop, J. M. Lancaster, R. L. Taylor. (1993). Use Of GIS In Optimizing Timber Thinning Strategies In The Eastern Sierra-Nevada. Professional Geographer 45(3):323-331. Online Article (UNR access only)
  • Zell, S. C. and S. K. Sorenson. (1993). Cyst Acquisition Rate For Giardia-Lamblia In Backcountry Travelers To Desolation Wilderness, Lake Tahoe. Journal Of Wilderness Medicine 4(2):147-154.
  • Christopherson, J. and W. S. Johnson. (1992). Trees For Tahoe Landscapes. Cooperative Extension Fact Sheet FS-92-49. Online publication
  • Christopherson, J. and W. S. Johnson. (1992). Turf And Erosion Control Grasses For The Tahoe Basin. Cooperative Extension Fact Sheet FS-92-53. Online publication
  • Stopping Time:  A Rephotographic Survey of Lake Tahoe, University of New Mexico Press (essays by Elizabeth Raymond and Robert E. Blesse), [award from AAUP, 1992; second printing, 1994; photograph from book selected for Historic Marker at Spooner Summit, #261].

Dissertations and Theses about the Tahoe Basin


Author:
Beckmann, Jon Paul
Year: (2002)
Title: Changing Dynamics Of A Population Of Black Bears (Ursus Americanus): Causes And Consequences.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 126
Thesis Type: PhD
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY (0329); BIOLOGY, ZOOLOGY (0472)
Abstract: Populations at the edge of their range are typically extinction-prone, and the probability of their persistence is challenged by habitat fragmentation coupled with rapid human population growth. At the interface of the Great Basin Desert and Sierra-Nevada Range including the Lake Tahoe Basin, black bears (Ursus americanus) have historically been ecologically restricted but they have recently experienced a rapid non-equilibrium response to increasing humans. To assess possible effects at contact zones, I tested predictions of resource-based models, first by contrasting biological features of individual bears between an urban-wildland interface (experimental area) and wildland areas (control area), and second by considering temporal changes in life-histories and ecology that span almost 15 years. Among the documented changes were: (i) declines of 90% and 70% in mean home range size for urban-interface males and females (respectively) relative to wildland bears (p < 0.05); (ii) body mass in which urban-interface bears averaged 30% more for both sexes relative to wildland animals (p < 0.05); (iii) alterations of denning chronology with urban-interface bears entering hibernacula later in the winter and emerging earlier than wildland conspecifics (p < 0.05); (iv) shifts in the pattern and amount of daily activity for bears in urban-interface areas relative to wildland conspecifics; and (v) bear densities which increased 3+fold in urban areas compared to baseline, historical densities. Additionally, since 1990 increases in the frequency of (i) urban-interface bears, (ii) collisions with vehicles, and (iii) citizen complaints were about 7000%, 1500%, and 1000% respectively. All mortalities (n = 59) since 1997 were due to anthropogenic causes. Finally, I examined the effectiveness of the six most common deterrents currently used by state and federal entities to alter the behavior of “nuisance” black bears using 62 individuals. My results indicate that expanding but clumped urban foods facilitated a rapid redistribution of bears across this arid landscape. The careless provisioning of food, whether deliberate or unintended, may be operating at scales substantially larger than that described here. If so, the altered distribution of populations of other species may also be compromising ecological processes, an issue that awaits further attention from conservation biologists. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Berger, Joel
Reference: 0-493-88259-6; DAI-B 63/10, p. 4459, Apr 2003

Author:
Bentley, Susanne Gail
Year: (1997)
Title: Lake Stories: An Exploration Of The Impact Of Humans On The Environment In The Lake Tahoe Basin (Nevada, California).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 99
Thesis Type: MA
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: LITERATURE, AMERICAN (0591); ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (0768); HISTORY, UNITED STATES (0337); GEOGRAPHY (0366)
Abstract: Lake Tahoe is one of the largest, deepest, and clearest mountain lakes in the world, and humans have been part of the Lake Tahoe basin ecosystem for thousands of years. In a series of narrative essays that draws from personal accounts, interviews with experts, historical research and information presented at public meetings, community forums and Cabinet level workshops in preparation for the Lake Tahoe Presidential Forum–President Bill Clinton’s 1997 environmental summit on Lake Tahoe–this thesis explores the connection of humans to the landscape at Lake Tahoe. It gives an overview of the history of humans’ relationship to the environment in the area and discusses the pressing problems of the present day: water quality, air quality, forest health, introduced species, economic health, architectural redevelopment and transportation. Due to the narrative essay format, no footnotes are used, but an extensive bibliographical essay appears at the end. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Tchudi, Stephen
Reference: 0-591-54484-9; MAI 36/01, p. 44, Feb 1998

Author:
Boyle, Christopher Francis
Year: (2003)
Title: South Tahoe Redevelopment Agency’s Ski Run Project No. 1: An Analysis And Assessment (California).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 129
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: GEOGRAPHY (0366); URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (0999)
Abstract: In 1985, the city of South Lake Tahoe, California, began a redevelopment effort to invigorate a sagging tourism- based economy. Tourist accommodations were considered to be poorly planned, old, and in desperate need of improvement. This thesis is an investigation into the city’s first redevelopment effort, the Ski Run Redevelopment Project No. 1. Looking first at the historical circumstances that led to the city’s physical decay and fiscal predicament, conclusions are made as to history’s impact on shaping Lake Tahoe’s south shore landscape. I then examine implementation of the project, its various components, and affected areas surrounding the Ski Run Redevelopment Project. Using a geographic information system and the original goals of the South Tahoe Redevelopment Agency, an assessment is made of the success of this project, considered crucial to South Lake Tahoe’s future. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Exline, Christopher
Reference: MAI 42/01, p. 87, Feb 2004

Author:
Cheng, Ericson W.
Year: (1997)
Title: An Automatic Instrumentation And Telemetry System For The Fallen Leaf Lake Watershed (California).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 73
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: ENGINEERING, ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICAL (0544); HYDROLOGY (0388); PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (0368)
Abstract: This thesis describes an automatic instrumentation and telemetry system for monitoring the snowpack, lake level, and streamflow on the Fallen Leaf Lake Watershed. This Sierra watershed, located south of Lake Tahoe, provides an opportunity to study a closed hydrological system. Much of the watershed lies within the Desolation Wilderness area, where the deployment of data collecting equipment is restricted to protect the primeval quality of the region. It is proposed that a remote data collection station can be adapted to blend into a wilderness environment for the purpose of gathering critical snowpack data without spoiling the natural character of the land. Establishing an automated and telemetered data gathering system provides valuable real- time data for the analysis and modeling of the watershed. Understanding the hydrological behavior of the watershed is essential to managing it as a water resource and for minimizing flooding problems. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Kleppe, John A.
Reference: 0-591-57913-8; MAI 36/01, p. 230, Feb 1998

Author:
Clarke, Richard Michael
Year: (1991)
Title: South Lake Tahoe Gaming: Analysis And History.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 108
Thesis Type: MS
Link: UNR Getchell Library Call Number: HB3999 .C63 1991
Keywords: ECONOMICS, COMMERCE-BUSINESS (0505); RECREATION (0814)
Abstract: The purpose of this thesis is to analyze the gambling industry at the south shore of Lake Tahoe. The study is intended to show how the industry developed, where it is today, and what influences it. The thesis is divided into three sections. The first section is the history of the area’s gambling industry development, who and what shaped it. This section is primarily historical, not analytical. The second section is a regression analysis of the exogenous factors that affect the area gaming. The factors found to directly influence gaming were California wages and salaries, seasons, local non-gaming recreational offerings, holidays, and inflation. The third section is an attempt to create a demand-side oriented tourism index for South Lake Tahoe that will give a clear, accurate view of the local tourism trends. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Eadington, William R.
Reference: MAI 30/01, p. 42, Spring 1992

Author:
Dahlberg, Bary Victor
Year: (2001)
Title: The Truckee River Act: Salvation Of Reclamation Or Servant Of Power? (Nevada, California).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 99
Thesis Type: MA
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: HISTORY, UNITED STATES (0337); POLITICAL SCIENCE, GENERAL (0615)
Abstract: Any controversy concerning water in the western United States is awash in decades of political maneuvering and legal battles; therefore considerable background is needed to introduce the Truckee River Agreement. This background is arranged chronologically and starts with the geography of the Truckee River Basin, some early plans for the Truckee River waters and a backdrop of United States water law. A serious conflict for Truckee River water started soon after The Reclamation Service initiated the Truckee-Carson Irrigation Project in 1902. The goal of the project was to irrigate hundreds of acres on the lower Carson River using a diversion of Truckee River water. The Reclamation Service quickly became desperate for water for the Project. The Service fought to gain control of Lake Tahoe waters, which resulted in the General Electric Decree. They initiated a Federal lawsuit to establish water rights in the Truckee Meadows that became known as the Orr Ditch Case. Three major interests emerged in the contest for Truckee River water: the Reclamation Service, The Truckee Meadows irrigators and the Sierra Pacific Company, a power and water utility. The depression and drought of the 1930’s along with Federal assistance forced the final negotiations for upstream water storage. Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickies approved the Truckee River Agreement on June 13, 1935 and President Franklin Roosevelt signed the appropriation for the Truckee River Storage Project four months later. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Rowley, William
Reference: 0-493-36570-2; MAI 40/02, p. 346, Apr 2002

Author:
Duke, Daron Glen
Year: (1998)
Title: Basalt Resource Use And Technological Organization In The North-Central Sierra Nevada (California).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 128
Thesis Type: MA
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: ANTHROPOLOGY, ARCHAEOLOGY (0324)
Abstract: The basalt technology of the north-central Sierra Nevada is typically interpreted in terms of the biface manufacturing process. This viewpoint is based on the assumption that the crude bifaces commonly found archaeologically are unfinished, rejected items. Research conducted on 37 sites between Lake Tahoe and Sierra Valley, California finds crude bifaces typically to be end-product tools rather than production failures. The ‘roughed out’ form of most bifaces is discussed as a byproduct of reduction strategies designed to maximize the use of abundant, but difficult to work, basalt resources. This thesis argues for a shift in interpretive perspective from biface production to biface use. The implications of this shift for studies in prehistoric, especially ‘Martis,’ land use, and the usefulness of biface ‘stages’ in lithic analysis are also discussed. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Fowler, Don D.
Reference: 0-591-86532-7; MAI 36/05, p. 1249, Oct 1998

Author:
Finkler, Gregg John
Year: (1979)
Title: Granite Chief: Backcountry User Profile And Management Approaches For Dispersing Use, Summer 1977. (Tahoe, California).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 168
Thesis Type: MS
Link:
Keywords: AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE (0478); RECREATION (0814)
Abstract: Abstract not available. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor:
Reference: MAI 18/03, p. 144, Fall 1980

Author:
Fiore, Mary F.
Year: (1999)
Title: Quantifying The Dissolved Phase Of MTBE And BTEX Exhausted From Marine Engines: Lake Tahoe Motorized Watercraft Study (California, Nevada).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 60
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (0768); RECREATION (0814)
Abstract: Marine engine exhaust is identified as a source of gasoline hydrocarbon pollution in fresh water lakes. The objective of this study was to determine if the occurrence of gasoline in Lake Tahoe was associated with motorized watercraft and to identify which engine types emitted the largest fraction of unburned gasoline into the water. This research demonstrated that the operation of all marine engines, regardless of operating cycle (two- or four-stroke) and induction system (carbureted or fuel injection), released measurable amounts of MTBE and BTEX. Engines powered by two-stroke carbureted systems, however, created considerably more hydrocarbon pollution then four-stroke marine engines. In a localized area, the concentrations of gasoline constituents released by a two-stroke engine were over an order of magnitude greater than concentrations measured for four-stroke and two- stroke direct injection technologies. Open water tests suggested two-stroke carbureted engines are the biggest polluters, discharging at least seven times more gasoline hydrocarbons then four-stroke marine engines. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Miller, Glenn C.
Reference: 0-599-67835-6; MAI 38/04, p. 964, Aug 2000

Author:
Flatland, Robert Michael
Year: (1993)
Title: Application Of The Rockfall Hazard Rating System To The Rock Slopes Adjacent To US 50 And State Route 28 On The East Side Of Lake Tahoe, Nevada.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 344
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: ENGINEERING, CIVIL (0543); GEOLOGY (0372)
Abstract: Techniques have been developed to both model rockfall behavior and to select which sites require rockfall mitigation. The Rockfall Hazard Rating System developed by the Oregon Department of Transportation is one such system used to establish a ranking of the hazardous slopes in a given region. The rockfall hazards of the Lake Tahoe study area range from small debris, which may distract a driver, to boulders as large as 3 ft. in diameter, which have resulted in motorist injury and even death. The Rockfall Hazard Rating System was used to evaluate the slopes adjacent to US 50 and State Route 28 on the east side of Lake Tahoe, Nevada. The system was effective in establishing a database of the most hazardous slopes in terms of rockfall, but clearly some modifications to the system seem appropriate. Geotechnical evaluations were performed on some of the more hazardous slopes and mitigation/remediation measures were proposed for all hazardous slopes. Scaling of loose slope debris, ditch deepening and reshaping, jersey barrier installation or improvement, wire meshing, and selective rock bolting were most commonly recommended. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Watters, Robert J.
Reference: MAI 32/05, p. 1431, Oct 1994

Author:
Fritchel, Patrick Earl
Year: (2003)
Title: Evaluation Of Erosion Control Strategies Used For Channel Protection In The Clear Creek Watershed, Eastern Sierra Nevada.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 140
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: ENGINEERING, CIVIL (0543); ENGINEERING, ENVIRONMENTAL (0775)
Abstract: Severe erosion is occurring at several locations in the Clear Creek watershed along U.S. Highway 50 between Carson City and Lake Tahoe. Erosion has caused problems related to slope stability along roadways and increased maintenance requirements, especially those associated with drainage structures. The physical characteristics of the upper Clear Creek watershed include steep slopes, thin soil sections, and highly weathered bedrock, which allow erosion to proceed almost unchecked. In numerous cases, the erosion has manifested itself in the form of deep gullies and rilled slopes. A combination of laboratory tests and field studies were conducted to assess the performance of several rolled erosion control products (RECPs). These RECPs were found to be effective in reducing erosion over granular bare soil by a magnitude of three. In general, RECPs constructed with components containing a rigid netting appeared to perform slightly better than other more flexible linings. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Dennett, Keith E.
Reference: MAI 42/02, p. 637, Apr 2004

Author:
Gangopadhyay, Arun Kumar
Year: (1989)
Title: Economics Of Water Transfers In The Tahoe-Truckee Basin Of Nevada.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 117
Thesis Type: MS
Link:
Keywords: ECONOMICS, AGRICULTURAL (0503)
Abstract: The problem of improving water allocation in the Tahoe- Truckee basin of Nevada has assumed great significance, particularly during recent drought in the State. One of the main issues is whether there are potential gains from both long-term and short-term water transfers from agricultural uses to non-agricultural uses. The main objective of this study is to examine this question and formulate, by using value of marginal productivity analysis and regression analysis, mechanisms for short- term allocation of water between agricultural and municipal uses for the Tahoe-Truckee basin of Nevada during drought. More precisely, this study attempts to outline procedures and implications for water transfers from the Sierra Valley, California to the Truckee Meadows in Nevada, and for water transfers from agricultural uses to municipal uses within the Truckee Meadows area under conditions of drought. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor:
Reference: MAI 28/01, p. 48, Spring 1990

Author:
Gore, Allison Lynn
Year: (1999)
Title: The Federal Role In Regional Scale Watershed Management In The Western United States. Case Study: Tahoe Basin Watershed Initiative (Nevada, California).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 54
Thesis Type: MA
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: POLITICAL SCIENCE, GENERAL (0615); ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (0768); URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (0999)
Abstract: The fundamentals of the American political system, with multiple layers and branches of government, are a reality of the institutional fragmentation that is inevitable in a nation of decentralized government. Regional water policies have evolved with shifts in federal and state institutions’ struggle for the balance of power. Historically, these changes have been incremental; however, in recent decades technological and economic advances, particularly in the West, along with environmental concerns, have fostered rapid changes in water-related institutions. As a new century approaches, the control of water resources at regionally defined scales has become fashionable, especially at the watershed level. New strategies have been championed to deal with the many concerns deriving from federal, state and local efforts to manage regional watersheds in the western U.S. The federal government plays a significant and essential role in the effective functioning of most watershed initiatives. A major focus of this research has been to examine the way that federal agencies support, impair, and participate in watershed policy and management. The Tahoe Basin will serve as a case study in order to examine federal influence in the modern watershed initiative. Reasons for considering the Tahoe Basin include (1) water resource management occurs at the federal, state, regional, and local level, (2) the Basin is a western watershed struggling with both conservation and development issues, and (3) there is significant federal support for and intervention in watershed management and conservation policy for the Basin. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Magennis, Leah
Reference: 0-599-43816-9; MAI 38/01, p. 75, Feb 2000

Author:
Gupta, Kimberly Tina
Year: (2002)
Title: An Evaluation Of Potential Contaminating Activities To The Truckee River And Lake Tahoe In Northern Nevada.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 448
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: ENGINEERING, ENVIRONMENTAL (0775); ENGINEERING, CIVIL (0543); ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (0768)
Abstract: Source water protection is an essential component for an effective protection plan for drinking water supplies. Nevada is the most arid state in the nation, and with competing consumers increasingly sharing limited water resources, source water protection is essential to ensure a future drinking water supply. According to the 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act, every public water system (PWS) serving more than 20,000 residents must complete a source water assessment. These assessments are meant to provide opportunities and tools to protect drinking water at its sources through the identification of contaminants and activities that potentially threaten public drinking water systems. Study results indicated that a contaminant spill from either the railroad or highway poses the most significant threat to both the Truckee River and Lake Tahoe drinking water sources. Other potential sources of contamination (PCAs) observed include stormdrains, sewage transfer stations and businesses.Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Adams, V. Dean
Reference: MAI 42/01, p. 285, Feb 2004

Author:
Holderman, Jill C.
Year: (1991)
Title: Development Of A Bike Path In The Ecologically Sensitive Lake Tahoe Basin.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 105
Thesis Type: MS
Link:
Keywords: PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (0368); HEALTH SCIENCES, RECREATION (0575); ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (0768); URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (0999)
Abstract: The environmental and developmental problems of a hike n’ bike path in an ecologically sensitive mountain lake area were researched. The path would extend the existing Incline Village bike path south along Highway 28 at Lake Tahoe. The high recreational pressure on the Lake Tahoe area has resulted in environmental degradation along the shoreline. Subjects covered in this analysis were examination of historical development of the study area, planning issues, integration with other recreational plans, and Intergovernmental Cooperative agreements. Two bike path alternatives were established and comparison of the plans were assessed to determine the most feasible alternative. The research indicates that the development of the proposed path will probably slow down the degradation occurring in the area allowing better control of recreational use; and thus, easier enforcement of regulations and maintenance of the area. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor:
Reference: MAI 29/04, p. 628, Winter 1991

Author:
Keaveney, Gregory J.
Year: (1999)
Title: Production Of Trihalomethanes And Haloacetic Acids From Chlorinated, Aqueous Plant Extracts.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 182
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: ENGINEERING, ENVIRONMENTAL (0775)
Abstract: In December 1998, the United States Environmental Protection Agency finalized the Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection Byproduct (D/DBP) Rule and Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule. USEPA’s D/DBP Rule lowers the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for trihalomethanes from 100 $/mu$g/L, to 80 $/mu$g/L. If a water treatment facility cannot meet the MCL of 80 $/mu$g/L, upgrades may be required. The effect of chlorinating an aqueous leachate of six different plant types, Quaking Aspen, Fremont Cottonwood, Cheatgrass, Greenleaf Manzanita, Jeffrey Pine and Basin Big Sage was examined for trihalomethane and haloacetic acid formation potential. The various plants were collected from watersheds in the Reno-Tahoe area. Results show that the grass and coniferous trees formed less trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids than the other species. With proper watershed protection-management techniques, it may be possible to lower precursor compounds contributing to DBP formation. This would have economic benefits to treatment facilities while lowering health risks.Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Adams, V. Dean
Reference: 0-599-35484-4; MAI 37/05, p. 1501, Oct 1999

Author:
LeNoir, James Sullivan
Year: (1999)
Title: Transport Of Current Use Pesticides To The Sierra Nevada Mountain Range.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 127
Thesis Type: PhD
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (0768); PHYSICS, ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE (0608); BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY (0329); BIOLOGY, ZOOLOGY (0472); BIOLOGY, LIMNOLOGY (0793)
Abstract: This dissertation consists of work conducted on the atmospheric transport of pesticides from California’s Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada mountains. During the winter of 1995–1996 single event wet deposition samples were collected at 533-m and 1,920-m elevations in the Sequoia National Park, located on the southwestern slope of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Samples acquired at these locations contained chlorothalonil (0.57–85 ng/L), and chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and malathion ranging from 0.045–24 ng/L. Similar concentrations of chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos were found in snow and surface water samples collected at Lake Tahoe in the central Sierra Nevada, during this time. Transport of pesticides during the summer months to the Sequoia National Park was assessed by collecting air, dry deposition and surface water samples in 1996. Pesticides found in highest concentrations matched peak summer applications of chlorpyrifos and endosulfan. Air concentrations ranged from 30 ng/m 3 at the 200-m elevation to below the limit of quantitation (0.5 pg/m 3) at the 1,920-m elevation. Surface water samples contained the same profile of pesticides as found in summer air. Detectable concentrations ranged from 0.4 ng/L to 122 ng/L. Surface water and frog tadpoles (Hyla regilla) were collected in 1998 in a transect of northern California from the Pacific Coast to Lake Tahoe. This study ascertained whether the agricultural communities of the Sacramento Valley were a significant source of pesticide residues to the northern Sierra Nevada mountain range. Detectable levels of diazinon were found in the surface waters in Sacramento Valley; no detectable pesticides were found past the foothills of the Sierras. While the data presented in this dissertation are not sufficient to make a complete evaluation of pesticide impact to the Sierra Nevada mountain range, conclusions can be made. Most pesticide concentrations show a clear correspondence between time and intensity of application rather than total annual usage. Pesticides in air, wet deposition and surface water are consistently higher at lower elevations, diminishing in higher elevations due to dilution and degradation during transport. Pesticide concentrations are below acute toxicity values for aquatic species. If pesticides are having an impact we were unable to determine an effect. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Seiber, James Nicholas
Reference: 0-599-35442-9; DAI-B 60/06, p. 2589, Dec 1999

Author:
Maholland, Becky Lynn
Year: (2002)
Title: Geomorphic Assessment Of Natural And Anthropogenic Sediment Sources In An Eastern Sierra Nevada Watershed (California).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 178
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: HYDROLOGY (0388); GEOLOGY (0372)
Abstract: Squaw Creek, a small (21.1 km2), subalpine watershed located approximately 9.6 kilometers northwest of Lake Tahoe, California between the towns of Tahoe City and Truckee, is listed as an impaired waterway for excessive non-point source sedimentation under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act. The watershed was evaluated from a geomorphic perspective to identify and characterize sources of sediment and sediment transport processes, quantify rates of hillslope and in-stream erosion, and assess the relative degree of impact of both natural and anthropogenic sediment sources on sediment delivery to the stream network. Calculated hillslope erosion rates show that the principal sources of sediment are related to land use impacts. Roads in the watershed contribute to sediment production by concentrating runoff which increases sediment load to the stream network. Most unimproved (dirt) roads connect either directly or indirectly with streams and therefore act as extensions of stream networks by effectively increasing watershed drainage density and subsequently sediment loads to streams. Geographic Information System modeling indicates that hillslope erosion susceptibility has increased in the watershed since 1939 as a result of land use impacts. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Bullard, Thomas F.
Reference: MAI 42/01, p. 187, Feb 2004

Author:
Rambo, Michele L.
Year: (1998)
Title: An Assessment Of The Environmental Policies Of The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (Nevada, California).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 109
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: GEOGRAPHY (0366); URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (0999); ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (0768); POLITICAL SCIENCE, PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (0617)
Abstract: The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) has been put in the position of managing growth and development in one of the country’s most popular recreational areas. The increasing growth through the years has significantly impacted the environment around Lake Tahoe. The TRPA has made improving the environment in the Lake Tahoe Basin one of their main priorities, and has developed several plans to accomplish their goals. The effectiveness of these plans has come into question as the clarity of Lake Tahoe continues to deteriorate, so alternative actions were developed during the 1997 Presidential Summit. It is hoped that these new actions will not only improve the environment of the Lake Tahoe Basin, but encourage all of the parties involved in Lake Tahoe’s future to work together towards keeping the area beautiful for future generations. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Exline, Christopher H.
Reference: 0-599-35476-3; MAI 37/05, p. 1338, Oct 1999

Author:
Skalski, Anne M.
Year: (1983)
Title: Factors And Effects Of Crowding On Lake Tahoe Beaches.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 121
Thesis Type: MS
Link:
Keywords: RECREATION (0814)
Abstract: Abstract not available. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor:
Reference: MAI 23/02, p. 263, Summer 1985

Author:
Solury, Theresa E.
Year: (2004)
Title: ‘Everlasting Remembrance’: The Archaeology Of 19th- Century Chinese Labor In The Western Lumber Industry (Nevada).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 142
Thesis Type: MA
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: ANTHROPOLOGY, ARCHAEOLOGY (0324); HISTORY, UNITED STATES (0337); SOCIOLOGY, ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES (0631)
Abstract: Chinese immigrants played a crucial role in the development of Western economics by supplying much needed manual labor. In the Nevada lumber industry Chinese men contributed the majority of labor for large-scale wood extractions from the 1870s through the late 1880s. This report documents an archaeological excavation at TY3935, a small domestic wood camp on Spooner Summit in the Tahoe Basin of the eastern Sierra Nevada. The findings supplement the limited historical record, offering new information on the litestyles, living conditions, and social activity of Chinese lumber employees in a remote location. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Hardesty, Donald
Reference: MAI 42/06, p. 1997, Dec 2004

Author:
Stone, Chris H.
Year: (2004)
Title: Money And Wilderness Management: The Recreation Fee Demonstration Program At Desolation Wilderness Area (California).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 155
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: GEOGRAPHY (0366); RECREATION (0814); POLITICAL SCIENCE, PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (0617)
Abstract: Wilderness holds a special place in the American tradition; wild landscapes and the values ascribed to them are interrelated and dynamic. Accommodating the established values of use and preservation in the modern context of increasing visitation and shrinking budgets is a serious challenge for wilderness managers. The Recreation Fee Demonstration Program (RFDP), enacted in 1996, is a controversial management initiative that emphasizes user fees to generate revenue for federal land administration. At Desolation Wilderness Area near Lake Tahoe, California, “Fee Demo” has transformed the psychological and physical wilderness landscapes. Some find the commercial tone of the program objectionable because paying to access public land commodifies and diminishes the wilderness experience. Fee Demo affects wilderness by building physical structures, promoting preservation programs and funding ecological restoration projects. The future of Fee Demo is uncertain. It may become a permanent fixture on the terrain of wilderness administration. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Berry, Kate
Reference: MAI 42/06, p. 2017, Dec 2004

Author:
Sutherland, James Colin
Year: (2001)
Title: Eighteenth Century Logging And The Geomorphic Response Of A Montane Watershed In The Carson Range, Western Nevada.
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 115
Thesis Type: MS
Link: Download (UNR Only)
Keywords: HYDROLOGY (0388); AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE (0478); ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (0768)
Abstract: Vicee Canyon, a small (5.2 km2), steep watershed on the east slope of the Carson Range, contains important information on what effects large scale logging during the late 1800s had on the geomorphic stability of this drainage basin. Similarities of Vicee Canyon to drainages in the Lake Tahoe basin allow the knowledge gained through this study to be applied in watersheds that affect the fragile ecosystems of the lake. Vicee Canyon was selected both for its depositional record that spans the latest Holocene and for the wealth of historical records and human artifacts associated with this watershed. Stratigraphic analysis, radiocarbon dating, and dendrochronology were used in concert with historic records and artifacts to determine that the Comstock-era logging in fact caused an increase in the amount of sediment being delivered to the channel in Vicee Canyon. A large portion of this historic sediment has made its way out of the drainage to the alluvial fan, while a small amount remains in storage along the channel walls of the drainage basin. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Wells, Stephen G.
Reference: 0-493-36599-0; MAI 40/02, p. 420, Apr 2002

Author:
Walsh, Laurie Alane
Year: (1995)
Title: Three Views Of ‘Lam Watah’: Cross-Cultural Interpretation At A Washoe Cultural Site (Nevada).
Institution: University of Nevada Reno
No. Pages: 132
Thesis Type: MA
Link:
Keywords: ANTHROPOLOGY, CULTURAL (0326); ANTHROPOLOGY, ARCHAEOLOGY (0324)
Abstract: The research presented in this thesis develops an alternative method for presenting information about cultural sites on public lands for a Washoe archaeological site near South Lake Tahoe, Nevada. Recreational interpretation uses anthropological and archaeological information to present educational materials on signs and wayside exhibits on public lands. Therefore, the ethical issues relating to the ownership, stewardship, and understanding of archaeological sites by cultures other than white-middle class Americans are relevant. Multicultural perspectives are not well developed at public exhibits. Parallel and ‘hot’ interpretation provide culturally sensitive methods of presenting multiple perspectives that result in cross- cultural interpretation. Cross-cultural interpretation was accomplished by interpreting the site from archaeological, ethnographic, and contemporary Washoe Indian perspectives. These perspectives were woven into a single explanation of an archaeological site providing a holistic exhibit and one that weights the Washoe and anthropological explanations of the past equally. Note: dissertation citations and abstracts contained here are published with permission of ProQuest Information and Learning. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by addressing your request to UMI® Dissertation Services, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346 USA. Telephone (734) 761-7400; Web-page: wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations.
Advisor: Fowler, Catherine
Reference: MAI 34/01, p. 97, Feb 1996

 

Tahoe Research, Scholarship & Outreach at the University of Nevada, Reno

Related  Videos

in Digital Collections, University of Nevada, Reno Libraries

Special Reports and Historic Documents

in Digital Collections, University of Nevada, Reno Libraries

  • First Sighting of Lake Tahoe by the John C. Fremont Expedition. John C. Fremont, 1844.
    Excerpts from Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains in the Year 1842 and to Oregon and Northern California in the years 1943-’44 by Brevet Captain J.C. Fremont of the Topographical Engineers. Washington DC: Gales and Seaton, Printers. Includes an illustration and two maps.
  • Lake of the Sky: Lake Tahoe. George Wharton James, 1915. New York: J. F. Tapley Co.
    A 385-page digital book. A history of the earlier years of the Tahoe area. Includes photographs; Tahoe-related appendices on Mark Twain, Thomas Starr King, John Le Conte, and John Vance Cheney (with excerpts of their writings) and resorts.
  • Lake Tahoe and the High Sierras: A History of the Comstock Lode & Mines. Dan de Quille, 1889.
    Excerpts from A History of the Comstock Silver Lode and Mines Virginia, NV: F. Boegle. Dan De Quille was the editor of the Territorial Enterprise in Virginia City and chronicled much of the Comstock area history.
  • Lake Tahoe Lumber Operations. (Scientific American, 1877). 1877. Scientific American (November 10): 291.
    A short piece describing the lumber industry in the Tahoe area in 1877.
  • Letters no. 1, 2, and 3 in A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains. Isabella Bird, 1879.
    Letters written to her sister during her six-month journey by train and on horseback in the autumn and winter of 1873 from San Francisco to the Rockies. The first three pertain to the time she spent near Lake Tahoe. Originally published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons in New York.
  • Physical Studies of Lake Tahoe. John Le Conte, 1883-1884. Overland Monthly
    Part I, November 1883, pp. 506-515: History of the lake’s name; temperature/depth chart, with comparisons to Lake Geneva; transparency measurements; “why drowned bodies do not float.”
    Part II, December 1883, pp. 595-612: “Colors of the Waters of Lake Tahoe.”
    Part III, January 1884, pp. 41-46: “Rhythmical Variations in Levels of Lakes: or ‘Seiches.'”
  • Synopsis of a Paper Upon A Summer’s Exploration in the Sierra Nevada. A. R. Conkling, 1877. Journal of the American Geographical Society of New York 9: 86-87.
    Includes some facts about the lumber industry of the time.

Links to Related Resources 

  • A Victory for Land-Use Planning
    Georgetown Environmental Law and Policy Institute (GELPI)
  • Anti-Icing Strategies Improve Safety and Protect the Environment
    Federal Highway Administration
  • Area Newspapers
    tahoe.com
  • Bernadine Suitum
    Petitioner v. Tahoe Regional Planning Agency
  • Boating Safety and Environmental Hints forn Lake Tahoe
    California Department of Boating and Waterways
  • California Tahoe Conservancy
    California Tahoe Conservancy
  • Federal Actions in the Lake Tahoe Region
    William Clinton GSA
  • Incline Creek Experimental Watershed
    Desert Research Institute
  • Integrated Analysis of Landscape Processes for the Management of Agricultural Watersheds
    USDA Agricultural Research Service
  • Keep Tahoe Blue
    League to Save Lake Tahoe
  • Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit
    USDA Forest Service
  • Lake Tahoe Environmental Education Coalition
    LTEEC
  • Lake Tahoe Restoration Act : Preserving our Nation’s Natural Resources
    Senator Dianne Feinstein
  • Lake Tahoe Summer Colony
    Frank Lloyd Wright Exhibition
  • Lake Tahoe-Nevada State Park
    Nevada Division of State Parks
  • Pilot Filtration Studies for Turbidity and Nutrient Removal at Lake Tahoe
    Storm Water Program
  • Protection of Lake Tahoe Basin : Nevada Administrative Code
    Nevada Legislative Council Bureau
  • Recreation.gov
    USDA Forest Service
  • Research on MTBE
    U.C. Davis
  • State Route 89 – Emerald Bay
    Federal Highway Administration
  • Tahoe Center for a Sustainable Future
    Tahoe Center for a Sustainable Future
  • Tahoe Heritage: The Bliss Family of Glenbrook, Nevada
    University of Nevada Press
  • Tahoe Regional Planning Agency
    Tahoe Regional Planning Agency
  • Tahoe Rim Trail
    Tahoe Rim Trail Association
  • tahoeinfo.com
    South Lake Tahoe Chamber of Congress
  • Teaming Up for Tahoe
    Desert Research Institute
  • UC Davis Lake Tahoe Research In The News, 2005
    Tahoe Environmental Research Center, U.C. Davis
  • Watershed Response to Natural and Man-made Stress: Nutrients in Lake Tahoe
    Science Memorandum, 18, U.C. Davis